Movie Making MacGyver Stuff – #EdCampOAISD #MACUL16

Here are links for my EdCamp and MACUL MacGyver video making sessions

iMovie Fifth Grade Book Reports

iOS Apps
iMovie
Keynote
Replay
Splice
Avid Pinnacle Studio Pro
Action Movie FX
Canva
Path On – Swipe To Type
DoInk

WeVideo
iCloud.com

Video Story Problems
Preserving History
Caterpillar Nurse Cam
Covering Hawkeye Sports

Practical example of using the Shooting Gallery

Formative Assessment/Screencasting
ShowMe appExplainEverythingEducreations

Only you  can prevent Vertical Video Syndrome

Green Screen Effects Folder – VeeScope Live

Dave Tchozewski – Green Screen Resources

Keynote Animation Project from Linda Dong

A Simple Approach To Dealing With Personal Devices In The Classroom

I have long been an advocate for bring your own device (BYOD) in the classroom. I figure that if kids have tools that know well and use well, then there is no reason to restrict them from using them in the classroom.

Key word there: tools, as in apps for learning.

Too many of the teachers who are frustrated with dealing with personal devices often don’t take the learning tools approach. Instead of allowing for specific purposes they end up policing. They collect phones ahead of class or insist on no devices being out at any time. Kids at our high school have even started bringing old phones to turn in at the beginning of class so they can still access their working devices.

I’m not naive enough to think that every time a kid has a device out in the library, they are using it solely for a learning activity. What I do know from 20+ years in the classroom that kids for the most part respond well when you give them some clear expectations and put the responsibility on them to do the right thing.

Despite spending a lot of time on this early in the year I too have had some frustration with our students in the library who are taking online classes. Too many are “forgetting” or just seeing how much they can push our guidelines with personal devices. Usually a friendly reminder gets everybody back on track. Sometimes it takes a few reminders.

Here is a new poster adorning our work stations. The kids got a laugh out of the devices I chose but more importantly the “got” the message.

Screen Shot 2016-01-18 at 9.22.52 AM

Flite Test | Tile Can Help You Find Almost Anything

I have often infuriated my family by not being able to find my keys when we are all ready to go someplace. Last January they bought me a Tile ($25 on their site) that hooks on my keys and connects to an iPhone app. Now when I can’t find my keys and I am within less than 150 feet I tap a button on my phone and the tile starts to chirp. The app uses bluetooth to locate the tile and pinpoints it on a map. Even if I am a greater distance away, the map shows the last place the tile talked to my phone.

All of the above would be cool enough but Tile uses all other users with the app as anonymous trackers. That means that any time anybody gets within 150 feet of a Tile no matter who it belongs to, it’s location is registered with the company and updated on the owner’s app. Imagine losing your keys or a camera or anything at Disney World. Instead of having to look under every seat of every boat in It’s a Small World, just fire up your app and chances are it will get pinged by another Tile user.

The guys from Flite Test have created a great video demonstrating how all of these features work together. Check out the Tile Blog as well.

 

Inserting Pics and Marking Them Up Is Now Easier in iOS 9 Mail

A couple of neat updates in the iOS 9 Mail app makes inserting photos and then marking them up a lot easier and intuitive.

At an Apple seminar in Jenison today I learned that in iOS 9 the Mail app now has a camera icon above the keyboard when you type in the body of the message.

camerainios9keyboard

Once you have inserted your picture, tap it to bring up a toolbar with the new “Markup” choice.

markupbar

Mark up your picture with a set of drawing, text, and signature tools.

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This is a great addition that allows us to communicate more clearly and then saves a bundle of time without having to mark up pictures in additional apps.

iPad Apps for Film-making | A Listly List

Here is a great post I came across today highlighting 9 apps for film-making. These are great app smashers where each one performs a certain task and those products can all be mashed into one project.

iPad Apps for Film-making

Listly by Cathy Hunt

These apps provide us with endless possibilities for innovative teaching and creativity in the classroom. Introducing apps and workflows should be a derivative of considered instructional design and pedagogies that stems from a focus on the learning.

See Cathy’s full post: iPad Apps for Film-making | A Listly List.

Insanely Great Science Journals from 1:1 Android 1st Graders

The first graders in Kristi Zoerhof’s class at Bentheim Elementary each have their own Sony Android tablet.

This spring the class studied the metamorphosis of caterpillars into butterflies. Kristi sent the students daily pictures via Chirp and then by using the Skitch app, each student annotated his or her observations. Students then built beautiful journals of the entire process in the Book Creator app.

By using real pictures and annotation tools, students were able to create truly scientific products as opposed to the old cartoonish drawings they used to make in their science journals. The depth of exploration and knowledge displayed is fascinating.

A year ago, Kristi tried this project as part of a pilot with Sony. That class organized findings in Pic Collage. Employing Book Creator has taken it to a completely new level as the app creates an ePub readable on many electronic devices.  To share it here I had to convert the .ePub in Zamzar to a PDF and upload it to Issuu.

 

Below is one student’s beautiful work. Original .ePub to download